• Barth Bakery

Linzer Plätzchen (Butter Cookies with Jam)

Updated: Feb 21

Linzer cookies feature two buttery shortbread cookies sandwiched together with jam that peeks through the cutout on top of the cookies. The name comes from the Linzer Torte, which is a pastry with a lattice dough on top of a jam filling, that originated in the Austrian city of Linz. Like the famous Linzer Torte, Linzer cookies feature an almond-based dough. Popular throughout Austria and Germany, these buttery, nutty cookies have a hint of lemon and are generously dusted with confectioners’ sugar. These holiday cookies not only look beautiful, but they taste incredibly delicious.


Buttery Linzer Cookies with Jam
Linzer Shortbread Sandwich Cookies
Beautiful Almond Linzer Cookies

Makes about 18 sandwich cookies


Ingredients

Butter Cookies

  • ¾ cup unsalted butter, softened

  • ⅔ cup granulated sugar

  • 2 large egg yolks

  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

  • 1 tsp lemon zest, finely grated

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour

  • 1 cup ground blanched almonds

  • ½ tsp salt

  • ¼ tsp ground cinnamon


Decorations

  • ⅓ cup confectioners’ sugar

  • ½ cup seedless jam (i.e., strawberry, apricot, raspberry, red currant, etc.)

Directions

Butter Cookies

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside.

  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter and sugar, and beat on medium speed for 3 minutes. Add the egg yolks, vanilla, and lemon zest and beat for another 3 minutes on medium speed.

  3. In a separate large bowl, whisk together the flour, ground almonds, salt, and cinnamon.

  4. Add the flour mixture to the butter mixture and beat on medium-low speed until a crumbly dough forms. Press the dough together with your hands and flatten into a disk. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour.

  5. Once chilled, divide the dough into two portions, and briefly knead each portion by hand.

  6. On a floured work surface, use a rolling pin to roll out the dough to about ⅕-inch thickness. Cut half of the dough using a round or scalloped cutter with your chosen insert and an equal number of rounds without the insert. Transfer the cut-out cookies to the prepared baking sheets. Place the cookies in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to chill.

  7. Bake cookies for 8-12 minutes in the middle of the oven until the edges are very lightly browned. Transfer the cookies to a cooling rack and allow to cool completely.


Decorations

  1. Sprinkle the tops of the cooled cookies (with the holes) with confectioners’ sugar. Pipe jam on top of the cookie bottoms (without a hole) and gently place the top parts of the cookies on top of the jam. Let the cookies dry for about 2 hours.


Germany is famous for its Christmas cookies, many of which are very old and have been passed down over generations. These popular, traditional cookies can be found all over homes and iconic outdoor Christmas markets in November and December.

Lebkuchen (German Gingerbread Spice Cookies)

Zimtsterne (German Cinnamon Star Cookies)

Bethmännchen (German Marzipan Cookies)

Zitronenherzen (German Lemon Heart Cookies)

Old German Honey Cookies (Alte Deutsche Honig Plätzchen)

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